EYFS Profile fails nearly 60% of children in pilot

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The new Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (EYFSP) was introduced in September 2012. The new Profile made changes to the way children are assessed at the end of the EYFS (the end of academic year in which a child turns five).

A report by the government describes the  results of the EYFSP pilot, which took place in the summer term of 2012, and shows that only 41% of the 20,000 children reached the “Good Level of Development” in the prime areas of learning; personal, social and emotional development, physical development, communication and language, and in the specific areas of maths and literacy. This covers 12 of the 17 early learning goals in the revised EYFS.

Megan Pacey, chief executive of Early Education, said it would be at least two years before it would be possible to see if the system worked.

“The statistical data makes for interesting reading, but it is difficult to compare and contrast between the previous EYFS profile and this EYFS profile data because we’re not comparing apples with apples,” she said.

“What we do know is that children will be defined as having reached a Good Level of Development against the EYFS goals and the expectations of some of those goals have changed substantially under the revised EYFS.

“It remains to be seen whether, for example, some of the mathematics early learning goals have been set at an appropriate level and whether the expected levels of development for children of this age are appropriate or not.”

Early years providers will be expected to carry out the first EYFS profiles assessments including the Good Level of Development measure this summer

The report was produced to support the introduction of the new Profile from September, and can be downloaded here.

It’s key findings are sumamrised as:

  • 41% of children were assessed as achieving a GLD.
  • The total average point score (1) was 32 points.
  • Gaps by characteristics for example by gender and free school meals (FSM) were wider in the new GLD than the old GLD (2)
  • The widest gaps in the proportion of children achieving the expected level in all of the eight ELGs within the three prime areas of learning was between children whose first language is English and children whose first language is other than English. The gap was 19 percentage points.
  • 61% of children achieved the expected level in all of the prime areas of learning.
  • Across the 17 early learning goals (ELG), performance ranged from 58% of children achieving (3) the expected level of development to 89% of children achieving the expected level of development. The highest performing ELG was health and self-care and the lowest was numbers.
  • All ELGs in the new Profile have statistically significant (4) relationships with each other. This means that if a child performs well in one ELG they are also likely to perform similarly in other ELGs. The strength of each of these relationships is detailed in sections 2.9 and 4.2.
  • The difference between the lowest and highest performing LA was greatest in the numbers and shape, space and measures ELGs.
  • The difference between performance in the old and new GLD was greatest for children of a Black ethnicity. Performance between the two measures differed by 32 percentage points with performance in the old GLD being higher. This compares to just 22 percentage points for children of a White ethnicity.

Have you read the report?  Do you support it’s findings?

 

1. A child is assigned one point for an emerging ELG, two points for an expected ELG and three points for an exceeding ELG.
2. The proportion of children that achieve six or more points across the seven personal, social and emotional development and communication, language and literacy scales and 78 or more points across all 13 scales.
3. Throughout this paper, ‘achieved’ is defined as either expected or exceeding.
4. Significant at the 95% confidence level or higher.

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2 thoughts on “EYFS Profile fails nearly 60% of children in pilot

  • April 8, 2013 at 10:20 am
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    TOO MUCH EMPAHASIS ON GOVERNMENT TARGETS AT THIS EARLY AGE. TEACHERS DO A GREAT JOB DAY TO DAY ALREADY. LET THE CHILDREN AT THIS AGE ENJOY THEIR LEARNING WITHOUT THIS PRESSURE. THE FAST PACE OF THE CLASSROOM TO FIT EVERYTHING IN I FEEL IS RIDICULOUS. GIVE THESE CHILDREN TIME TO LEARN AT A PACE THAT SUITS THEIR AGE GROUP BEFORE WE HAVE A COUNTRY FULL OF MORE STRESSED INDIVIDUALS.

    THILDY LOWE’S COMMENTS ABOVE ARE GREAT I TOTALLY AGREE WITH THE COMMENTS THILDY MADE ON APRIL 3, 2013 AT 8:50 P.M

    Reply
  • April 3, 2013 at 8:50 pm
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    Basically you are talking here about children of different ages, around 5 years, and at that stage in the development, 3, 6 months or more can make a tremendous difference. At that particular age, children grow in so many ways, they may stand still academically and put all their energy into growing and physical activities, they may choose to concentrate on learning to read, because this is what they want to do, because they love stories and see other people read, or they may be totally absorbed in building, constructing, creating, being artistic, they may be consumed by numbers, and how they work, or listening to stories. They might want to dance to music and find out all about rhythm. They might want to concentrate on friendships, finding out how socialising works. And so they should be allowed to do these things at that age, without having to score in this or that field. Children are allowed to be and grow in other countries of the EU, why does Britain insist on ‘failing’ them as soon as they get on their feet? We have all these slogans, ‘every child matters’ ‘every child is unique’ etc. etc. and then we try to get them to do things they are not ready for and worry the parents. And some children have a very hectic home life, if both parents are working and there are other siblings, and some don’t. They sometimes spend many hours in a setting. It should also be a place where they can sit and wonder and ponder.
    Children at this age are fascinated with the world around them and love projects on that sort of theme, opening their eyes, and sometimes they open our eyes, to see what is around. When will the people, sitting at desks, dreaming up all these goals ever learn?

    Reply

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