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A 2-year-old has part of his ear “torn off and eaten” at Birmingham nursery

A 2-year-old has part of his ear “torn off and eaten” at Birmingham nursery

Two-year-old Daniyaal Abubaker was attending his second day at Mucky Pups Day Nursery in Garretts Green Lane, Birmingham, when he suffered a major injury to his right ear. Daniyaal needed 10 stitches and spent 2 nights in hospital to repair the damage, although it is not clear exactly how the incident happened.

The toddler’s mother, Afsha, 26, claims that she was given varying versions of the incident by nursery staff, including that he had been bitten by another child. Horribly, the missing part of the ear was not found and the family were told it may have been “eaten” by the other child.

Mrs Abubaker, said: “We still don’t know what happened to our son to this day, but to see your son in terrible pain with part of his ear missing was just horrific. I couldn’t stop crying. Daniyaal has been left traumatised. Sometimes when I move close to his face to kiss him he gets upset, he doesn’t like anyone to go close to his ear. He has been scarred mentally, not just physically.”

Mrs Abubaker said she received a call at around 11.30am on September 25th from the nursery owner, to say her son had injured his ear in a fall and that he “might require stitches”.

However, when her sister-in-law rang the nursery shortly afterwards, she was informed that Daniyaal had been punched.

Mrs Abubaker claims another sister-in-law, Arooj Arooj, picked injured Daniyaal up from the nursery, where the owner told her that he had been “bitten” by another child there.

‘‘When I spoke to the nursery again, and asked her what had happened to the piece of ear, they said the child must have swallowed it.’’

The family have contacted the police who are investigating the incident.

 

Ofsted inspection

Shortly after the alleged incident on September 25th, Ofsted inspectors visited the nursery and rated it ‘inadequate’.

They claimed risk assessments were not “rigorous enough” and stated the nursery did not “address all safety issues”.

A spokesman for West Midlands Police said: ‘‘Specialist officers from West Midlands Police Public Protection Unit are reviewing an incident, in which a young child suffered an injury to his ear.

‘‘Officers are in the process of contacting the family and relevant agencies, including Children’s Social Care, as part of the on-going inquiry.’’

Ofsted inspectors visited the nursery on October 2nd and gave it an inadequate rating and flagged up health and safety issues as an area of concern.

The report states: “Risks assessments are not rigorous enough as they do not address all safety issues in the nursery and staff do not help children learn how to be safe during activities.”

With such inconsistency in how staff reported this issue, how would you have handled things differently?
Please share your thoughts below.

Nearly half of 5 year olds are not achieving expected standards at school

Nearly half of 5 year olds are not achieving expected standards at school

Recent press stories have made much of the low numbers of 5 year-olds starting school at the expected standards in maths and literacy, with the implication that the EYFS, or those delivering it, are at fault.

The report shows that nearly half (48%) of children failed to achieve a "good" level of development, which is considered to be at least the expected level within the three prime areas as well as the expected standards in literacy and mathematics.

The figures make interesting reading, with 61% achieving the expected level in literacy and 66% in maths, according to data published by the Department for Education (DfE).

Other areas achieve better results with 89% at the expected level in physical development and 87% in expressive arts and design.

The figures are based on the new EYFS measures introduced just over a year ago, and are taken from the first assessments conducted this summer. The previous Early Years Foundation Stage, with its 69 measures, was criticised as being too bureaucratic.

There was a substantial disparity between the achievement levels of girls and boys.

"Girls outperformed boys in all areas of learning," says the DfE's summary of the findings, with 60% of girls achieving a good level of development, compared with 44% of boys.

In literacy, 69% of girls achieved at least the expected level, compared with 53% of boys.

 

The gap is closer in maths, with 70% of girls at the expected level, against 63% of boys.

A DfE spokeswoman said the new streamlined profile for the foundation stage "places a stronger emphasis on the areas which are most essential for a child's development and a greater focus on the key skills children need for a good start in life".

‘Our reforms are also focusing on improving the quality of professionals working in the early years, by introducing early years teachers and early years educators into nurseries who will specialise in early childhood development.

‘Ofsted is introducing a tougher early years inspection framework to improve outcomes, and put a stronger emphasis on the areas which are most essential for a child's development, such as strong communications and a good vocabulary’, she added.

Liz Bayram, chief executive of the Professional Association for Childcare and Early Years (PACEY), said, ‘PACEY recognises that the Early Years Foundation Stage framework has had a positive impact on raising standards within the early years. As this is the first use of the revised EYFS, it gives us a starting point, rather than telling us a direction of travel.

‘These figures paint a really positive story of how children are building social skills. However, there are areas of concern highlighted by these figures, particularly that only 52 per cent of children have achieved a good level of overall development, and there is an attainment gap between boys and girls. We need to do more to support childcare professionals, who are central in helping children to be both school-ready, and life-ready too. Low status, low pay and declining funding and support threatens the attempts by childminders, nannies and nursery workers to improve their professional status and their ability to deliver a high quality care.

‘PACEY is supportive of Ofsted and the EYFS in its role to provide children the best quality standard of care for children, but we need greater efforts from Government to support childcare professionals, who play a vital role in this process.’

Anne Longfield, chief executive of 4Children, added, ‘These figures reaffirm the challenge that is faced to make sure that every child in the Early Years Foundation Stage gets the best possible start and makes the progress that they are entitled to make.

‘As the figures show, nearly half of all children are not reaching a good standard of early learning goals. Of particular concern is that boys are doing less well than girls and children from poorer families and in more deprived areas are underachieving in comparison with those from more affluent areas.

‘We know that quality provision is the key to improving children’s outcomes hence it is imperative that the most is made of the new two year old offer and the focus on early intervention to ensure all children leave the EYFS with at least the expected level of development.’

One year in, how do you feel the new EYFS measures up? Are children better prepared for school at 5 years old? We’d welcome your comments below.

View our blog for more valuable news and information affecting the Childcare Sector.

Children who spend time in nurseries ‘more likely to develop behavioural problems’

Childcare study reveals behaviour issuesA major study of childcare has released evidence that children who spend time in nurseries or with child-minders are more likely to develop behavioural problems such as hyperactivity, bad behaviour and could be linked to emotional problems.

Oxford University researchers studied 991 families, where the mother was around thirty years old, and at least one child was aged around three months.

The team then assessed the children at the age of four, with questionnaires about their behaviour and emotions completed by both carers and parents. They also observed the type of care provided by parents and non-parental care for at least 90 minutes for those children placed in formal childcare settings.

The report, published in the journal Child: Care, Health and Development, said that “children who spent more time in group care, mainly nursery care, were more likely to have behavioural problems, particularly hyperactivity.  Spending more time in day care centres, over the total period was a predictor of total problem scores”.

“Children who spent more time in day care centres were more likely to be hyperactive,” the report states. “Children receiving more care by childminders were more likely to have peer problems.”

The authors concluded: “The findings in relation to childminding suggest that it might be out of home care rather than group care that raises the risk of behavioural difficulties.”

The researchers also tracked other forms of early years care and found that children who spent more time in pre-school playgroups – normally for a few hours a day, rather than a full-time nursery – had fewer problems.

The study states: “These findings suggest that interventions to enhance children’s emotional and behavioural development might best focus on supporting families and augmenting the quality of care in the home.”

In reply, Anand Shukla, of the Family and Childcare Trust, said: “Research shows that children who attend a nursery are better prepared for school and usually have better social skills such as cooperation with peers – skills which are essential to a child’s future happiness and good mental health. Often both parents have to work in order to maintain a family home.”

A Department for Education spokesman said: “We are reforming childcare and increasing high quality provision. Good quality early years education has been shown to have a lasting positive impact on children’s attainment and behaviour, especially those from low income backgrounds.”

Figures from the Department state that 441,000 children under five are regularly cared for in day nurseries while 272,000 are being looked after by childminders.

Children raised in poor families with high levels of parental stress or mental health problems were most at risk of developing emotional problems by the time they started school, it emerged.

Children who spend time in nurseries ‘more likely to develop behavioural problems’

Children who spend time in nurseries ‘more likely to develop behavioural problems’

A major study of childcare has released evidence that children who spend time in nurseries or with child-minders are more likely to develop behavioural problems such as hyperactivity, bad behaviour and could be linked to emotional problems.

Oxford University researchers studied 991 families, where the mother was around thirty years old, and at least one child was aged around three months.

The team then assessed the children at the age of four, with questionnaires about their behaviour and emotions completed by both carers and parents. They also observed the type of care provided by parents and non-parental care for at least 90 minutes for those children placed in formal childcare settings.

The report, published in the journal Child: Care, Health and Development, said that “children who spent more time in group care, mainly nursery care, were more likely to have behavioural problems, particularly hyperactivity. Spending more time in day care centres, over the total period was a predictor of total problem scores”.

“Children who spent more time in day care centres were more likely to be hyperactive,” the report states. “Children receiving more care by childminders were more likely to have peer problems.”

The authors concluded: “The findings in relation to childminding suggest that it might be out of home care rather than group care that raises the risk of behavioural difficulties.”

The researchers also tracked other forms of early years care and found that children who spent more time in pre-school playgroups – normally for a few hours a day, rather than a full-time nursery – had fewer problems.

The study states: “These findings suggest that interventions to enhance children’s emotional and behavioural development might best focus on supporting families and augmenting the quality of care in the home.”

In reply, Anand Shukla, of the Family and Childcare Trust, said: “Research shows that children who attend a nursery are better prepared for school and usually have better social skills such as cooperation with peers – skills which are essential to a child’s future happiness and good mental health. Often both parents have to work in order to maintain a family home.”

A Department for Education spokesman said: “We are reforming childcare and increasing high quality provision. Good quality early years education has been shown to have a lasting positive impact on children’s attainment and behaviour, especially those from low income backgrounds.”

Figures from the Department state that 441,000 children under five are regularly cared for in day nurseries while 272,000 are being looked after by childminders.

Children raised in poor families with high levels of parental stress or mental health problems were most at risk of developing emotional problems by the time they started school, it emerged.

Would your nursery cope with an unexpected drop-off?

Would your nursery cope with an unexpected drop-off?

A nursery in Sussex was forced to call the police after a Grandfather dropped off 2-year-old Lexi Francis and left before staff realized she did not attend their setting.

Staff took Lexi and let her start playing with other toddlers, before realising the mistake. Despite calls to other nurseries, they were unable to establish where she should be, and resorted to calling the local Brighton police for assistance.

Anne Cox, headteacher of Queen’s Park Primary and Nursery School, said: 'The child was dropped off at 1.15pm outside of normal drop off time to a member of staff who was covering for a sick colleague.
'It was quickly realised the child does not attend our nursery and we acted swiftly to raise the alarm and chased after the grandparent.

'When this was unsuccessful the police were called at 1.35pm. The police asked us to look after the child until 3.15pm which we did.

'The child was then taken to the police station and then onto the mother. We have very strong safe guarding procedures in place and our staff worked extremely hard to ensure the child was safe and reunited with her parent.'

A Sussex Police spokesman said: 'Police were called at 1.35pm on Monday October 7 to report that a child had been dropped off at a nursery school who did not usually attend the nursery.

'It was reported about 15 to 20 minutes after she had been dropped off. Officers attended the school around 3pm when the child was not collected and was taken to John Street police station.

'Other local nurseries were contacted and the child was identified. Her mum was contacted and she was returned home at 4.50pm.'

Lexi, was reunited with her mother, Lisa Francis, 28, who said the toddler escaped unscathed, but criticized the nursery for accepting her daughter without noticing she was not a usual attendee.

Miss Francis said: 'I was incredibly surprised to get a call from the police saying they had my two-year-old daughter - you don’t expect that until she is at least 16. I think it is incredibly worrying it was not noticed at first, that she was not one of their usual children. I was incredibly shocked. Thankfully she was okay.'

This story comes shortly after a 74-year-old grandfather visited a Kent school to collect his 6-year-old granddaughter for a doctor’s appointment.  A mistake led to the wrong child being presented to him, taken on a bus journey, seeing the doctor and having medicine prescribed, before being returned to school.

The grandfather was said to be “very short-sighted” and the girl shared the first name and hair colour as his granddaughter.

Are your safeguarding procedures robust enough?

Are you confident your procedures would prevent a similar event happening at your nursery?  Would you consider this scenario as part of your planning?

We’d love to hear your thoughts below.

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