PACEY hosting a live Q&A session

PACEY hosting a live Q&A session

If you have a question about the childcare sector, the role of childcare professionals or what you’d like to see happening in the wider childcare policy agenda, you might be interested to join an online debate tomorrow at 9am.

#askPACEY is a new way for you to engage with the Professional Association for Childcare and Early Years.  Chief Executive, Liz Bayram, and President, Penny Tassoni, will be online between 9am and 11am to answer your questions.

The Q&A session is open to anyone including parents and childcare professionals (you don’t need to be a PACEY member to ask a question). The goal is to engage everyone interested in early years childcare and child development in a respectful and engaging Q&A session.

Liz Bayram, Chief Executive of PACEY, said:

‘We’re looking forward to hearing directly from parents and childcare professionals – whether members or non-members – to find out their key concerns around childcare in the year ahead.

We’re currently seeing rapid change within the sector, from the opposition’s proposals to extend free entitlement and the government’s doubling of early years bursaries – to the introduction of childminder agencies and a gradual shift towards the formalisation of early years settings.

We know that many families are struggling to secure high quality childcare and have important questions to ask over how to find the right kind of provider, as well as how to ensure that they’re children are receiving the best quality of care possible. I hope that in this session we can offer valuable guidance and advice that will help both families and childcare professionals across the country.

I’m excited that this session will be the first of many in which we can communicate the work we’re doing to drive quality of care within the sector whilst responding directly to concerns from families and childcare professionals.’

Penny Tassoni, President of PACEY, said:

‘I’m delighted to have the opportunity to work with parents and childcare professionals, and to offer my advice on how best they might support children’s development.’ 

You can submit questions in advance in the following ways:

More information on the PACEY website

Report by PACEY on the meaning of "School Ready"

Report by PACEY on the meaning of "School Ready"

According to a survey released by PACEY,  children are growing up lacking confidence, struggling to communicate and unable to make friends because of the “schoolification” of the early years.

The Professional Association of Childcare and Early Years (PACEY) insisted that toddlers needed more time to play to give them the opportunities to develop social and emotional skills before the start of formal education.

It is claimed that Government’s reforms of the early year’s curriculum have focused too much on getting children “school ready” and does not allow them to develop naturally. This perception has been supported by plans to introduce a new baseline test for five-year-olds in England, and changes to vocational qualifications that make little reference to learning through play.

According to PACEY, fewer than one-in-20 teachers and a third of nursery staff believed it was necessary for children to focus on basic reading, writing and arithmetic in the early years.

PACEY has published its research report, Being school ready, which considers what the term “school ready” means for childcare professionals, parents and primary school teachers.

After months of research with childcare professionals, teachers, parents and children, it reveals:

1) Childcare professionals, parents and teachers interpret the term “school ready” in a way that is in stark contrast to that often stated by policy makers and regulators in England, and in a way that is more reflective of the approach taken by policy makers in Wales.

2) For a child to be considered school ready, respondents stated that cognitive and academic skills such as reading and writing are not as important as children being confident, independent and curious.

3) Teachers and childcare professionals (58% and 40% respectively) both stated that they felt there needed to be greater emphasis on play in England.

4) Almost half of all respondents – childcare professionals, parents and teachers alike – identified a lack of communication and common expectation between each other as a barrier to preparing a child for school.

5) Respondents agreed that being school ready is about more than just the child being ready for school – schools need to be ready for children, too.

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT FROM PACEY HERE

Report by PACEY on the meaning of “School Ready”

According to a survey released by PACEY,  children are growing up lacking confidence, struggling to communicate and unable to make friends because of the “schoolification” of the early years.

The Professional Association of Childcare and Early Years (PACEY) insisted that toddlers needed more time to play to give them the opportunities to develop social and emotional skills before the start of formal education.

It is claimed that Government’s reforms of the early year’s curriculum have focused too much on getting children “school ready” and does not allow them to develop naturally. This perception has been supported by plans to introduce a new baseline test for five-year-olds in England, and changes to vocational qualifications that make little reference to learning through play.

According to PACEY, fewer than one-in-20 teachers and a third of nursery staff believed it was necessary for children to focus on basic reading, writing and arithmetic in the early years.

PACEY has published its research report, Being school ready, which considers what the term “school ready” means for childcare professionals, parents and primary school teachers.

After months of research with childcare professionals, teachers, parents and children, it reveals:

1) Childcare professionals, parents and teachers interpret the term “school ready” in a way that is in stark contrast to that often stated by policy makers and regulators in England, and in a way that is more reflective of the approach taken by policy makers in Wales.

2) For a child to be considered school ready, respondents stated that cognitive and academic skills such as reading and writing are not as important as children being confident, independent and curious.

3) Teachers and childcare professionals (58% and 40% respectively) both stated that they felt there needed to be greater emphasis on play in England.

4) Almost half of all respondents – childcare professionals, parents and teachers alike – identified a lack of communication and common expectation between each other as a barrier to preparing a child for school.

5) Respondents agreed that being school ready is about more than just the child being ready for school – schools need to be ready for children, too.

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT FROM PACEY HERE

Joint chief exec of Pacey steps down from role.

Joint chief exec of Pacey steps down from role.

Liz Bayram has taken on the full time role after the former joint chief executive, Catherine Farrell, resigned on the 31st July.

A statement issued by PACEY reads: “Liz Bayram has now taken over the chief executive role full time. After almost eight years with organisation, and having supported PACEY to develop its new strategy and emerge with a new brand, Catherine felt it was time to move on to a different stage in her career. She wishes PACEY and its members the very best for the future.”

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