fbpx
Parenta’s Solution To The Early Years Staffing Crisis? A New Fast-Track Level 3 EYE Apprenticeship

Parenta’s Solution To The Early Years Staffing Crisis? A New Fast-Track Level 3 EYE Apprenticeship

The early years sector is facing a significant challenge; an additional 40,000 Level 3 qualified staff will be needed in the next three years to meet the increased demand from the Government's latest "free" offering. While this initiative is a win for parents, providers struggle to recruit qualified staff amidst existing underfunding issues.

 

Fast-Track Level 3 Early Years Educator Apprenticeship

Parenta, the UK’s largest early years training provider, has developed a unique solution by launching a Fast-Track Level 3 Early Years Educator (EYE) apprenticeship course.

CEO Dr Allan Presland said;

“The only way to overcome the staffing shortage is for early years settings to “grow their own”, meaning they must rapidly train and qualify new Level 3 staff, and our Fast-Track L3 EYE apprenticeship is designed to do just that.

While we continue to offer our standard 18-month apprenticeship, this accelerated path qualifies staff in just 53 weeks plus end-point assessment (EPA) – providing entry criteria are met. And with a 97% success rate for EPA, we guarantee that staff can successfully complete the program."

“Our mission is simple - to rapidly increase the number of Level 3 EYE qualified staff in early years settings to alleviate the staffing crisis we find ourselves in.

By doing this, settings will expand their capacity and grow their business, ultimately boosting their income.

Additionally, these increased funds will enable them to retain staff for longer, ensuring stability and quality care for the children.”

Train Your Early Years Staff - Limited Offer!

WE train your staff in 53 weeks plus EPA, and YOU retain skilled and qualified staff in your setting for longer - guaranteed.

Wave goodbye to your recruitment and retention worries by growing your own Level 3 qualified staff with Parenta's new fast-track Level 3 EYE course.

No stress, no hassle with our tailor made curriculum that is moulded to your setting.

Better yet! Enrol at least 2 members of staff for training with Parenta and get a FREE laptop for your setting, PLUS FREE tablets for your learners! (T&Cs Apply).

This offer is limited to the first 50 new training customers so sign them up today, it only takes 2 minutes!

Train Your Early Years Staff - Limited Offer!

Website Design

WE train your staff in 53 weeks plus EPA, and YOU retain skilled and qualified staff in your setting for longer - guaranteed.

Wave goodbye to your recruitment and retention worries by growing your own Level 3 qualified staff with Parenta's new fast-track Level 3 EYE course.

No stress, no hassle with our tailor made curriculum that is moulded to your setting.

Better yet! Enrol at least 2 members of staff for training with Parenta and get a FREE laptop for your setting, PLUS FREE tablets for your learners! (T&Cs Apply).

This offer is limited to the first 50 new training customers so sign them up today, it only takes 2 minutes!

Train Your Early Years Staff - Limited Offer!

Website Design

WE train your staff in 53 weeks plus EPA, and YOU retain skilled and qualified staff in your setting for longer - guaranteed.

Wave goodbye to your recruitment and retention worries by growing your own Level 3 qualified staff with Parenta's new fast-track Level 3 EYE course.

No stress, no hassle with our tailor made curriculum that is moulded to your setting.

Better yet! Enrol at least 2 members of staff for training with Parenta and get a FREE laptop for your setting, PLUS FREE tablets for your learners! (T&Cs Apply).

This offer is limited to the first 50 new training customers so sign them up today, it only takes 2 minutes!

Streamlining Parent Communication with Nursery Software

Streamlining Parent Communication with Nursery Software

Effective communication between parents and nurseries is essential in the busy world of early years education. By bringing updates and children's daily activities to life with a parent communication tool, nurseries can significantly enhance their engagement with parents. This keeps them informed and makes them active participants in their child's early learning journey. In this blog, we take a dive into how important it is to streamline parent communication with within your nursery management software.

Bridging the Gap Between Home and Nursery with Nursery Software

Parents often wonder about their child's day at the nursery - what activities they participated in, what milestones they achieved, and how they interacted with the other children. A reliable nursery software package that includes a parent communication app can help bridge this gap by providing real-time updates on children’s daily activities. This transparency ensures that parents are kept in the loop, fostering trust and a sense of involvement in their child’s education.

Enhancing Parental Engagement

Active parental engagement is a key factor in a child’s success. When parents are well-informed about their child's day, they can reinforce learning and development at home. Any comprehensive nursery software package has to include a parent communication channel that allows parents to receive instant notifications about their child's activities and achievements, making it easier for them to engage in meaningful conversations with their child and nursery staff.

Let’s look at some of the specifics that make a nursery software something every setting should be using.

Holistic Child Development 

Understanding a child's behaviour both at home and in the nursery is crucial for their holistic development. A parent communication app facilitates this by allowing parents to submit home observations. These insights, combined with observations from nursery staff, provide a comprehensive view of a child's development, helping educators tailor their approach to meet each child's unique needs.

Simplifying Scheduling and Attendance

Managing a child’s schedule can be challenging for parents, especially when balancing multiple responsibilities. Using a communication app will mean offering a clear view of past, present, and future booked sessions. This ensures that parents can plan and stay organised, reducing the stress associated with managing their child's nursery schedule.

Financial Transparency

Financial management is another critical aspect where effective communication plays a vital role. Using a parent communication tool will allow parents to access account balances, invoice breakdowns, and downloadable invoices and payment receipts directly within the app. This level of financial transparency helps parents stay informed about their payments and due dates, even when the nursery is closed.

Streamlining Pick-Up Processes

Busy pick-up times can often lead to congestion and hurried interactions. With instant insights into their child’s day provided by an app, parents can have a clear understanding of how their child's day went before arriving at the nursery. This reduces the need for lengthy discussions during pick-up times, ensuring a smoother and more efficient process.

Attendance Tracking

A good communication app will have an online register which simplifies attendance tracking and enhances child safety. Staff can easily record and update attendance in real time, providing instant notifications to parents and ensuring accurate records. This feature also aids in emergency preparedness and compliance with regulatory requirements by generating automated attendance reports.

EYFS Tracker

The best nursery software packages include an EYFS development tracker to help monitor children's progress efficiently. Staff can track developmental milestones, create personalised learning plans, and share detailed progress reports with parents. This tool reduces paperwork, supports personalised learning, and generates visual progress reports to celebrate achievements and identify areas needing support.

Parenta's Comprehensive Nursery Software Solution

With all of this taken into careful consideration, Parenta’s parent communication app is designed with both parents and nurseries in mind. Available for download on both Android and iOS devices, it is user-friendly and accessible. The app is part of a comprehensive nursery software package, offering additional features that enhance nursery operations at no extra cost. By integrating these features into your nursery management, you not only streamline communication with parents but also enhance the overall efficiency and effectiveness of your nursery operations.

Conclusion

Incorporating a parent communication app into your nursery’s management system is more than just a technological upgrade; it’s a step towards building a stronger, more transparent, and collaborative relationship with parents. This not only enhances the overall efficiency of nursery operations but also contributes significantly to the well-being and development of the children in your care.

About the author:

Pam McFarlane, a remarkable individual that wears the hats of an Educator, Coach, and Global Explorer. With a deep-rooted passion for nurturing well-being and mental health in the realm of early years, Pam's journey is one of profound impact and meaningful exploration.

About the author:

Pam McFarlane, a remarkable individual that wears the hats of an Educator, Coach, and Global Explorer. With a deep-rooted passion for nurturing well-being and mental health in the realm of early years, Pam's journey is one of profound impact and meaningful exploration.

About the author:

Pam McFarlane, a remarkable individual that wears the hats of an Educator, Coach, and Global Explorer. With a deep-rooted passion for nurturing well-being and mental health in the realm of early years, Pam's journey is one of profound impact and meaningful exploration.

Thriving At Work: Master Team Dynamics And Mental Health!

Thriving At Work: Master Team Dynamics And Mental Health!

Master Team Dynamics - Did you know that we spend about one-third of our life either sleeping or attempting to do so? Or that the average person will spend one-third of their life at work? That’s roughly 90,000 hours at work over your lifetime! That leaves one third of our life to do the things we want and need to do. 

So, just who do you spend one third of your time with? It’s a bit like "Big Brother". A number of differing personalities are thrown together like a ready-made family and told to navigate the situations that arise. We know how that can turn out! Harper Lee, in To Kill a Mockingbird, says, “You can choose your friends but you sho' can't choose your family…” 

In the same way, for the third of our life spent at work, we cannot choose our colleagues. We are gathered together within an enclosed space, doing the work of super-humans, day after day. 

Our team dynamics are a spectrum of personalities, a motley medley of characters and this is the team’s strength and their challenge. 

Where do we start with working well with each other? We start with knowing ourselves. 

Personality Tests For Team Dynamics

There are many personality tests one can do to help you answer the question, ‘Who am I?’ One of the most well-known is the Myers-Briggs personality test, which you can easily access online. It’s an oldie but a goodie, and it gives us pause for thought. Knowing yourself is the first step in understanding others.  

Personality traits are characteristic patterns in how you think, feel, and act. It involves your character and core beliefs and your inborn temperament. 

When we look at our team members, there is a great deal of diversity. We are not an homogenous unit. We are of different ages, genders, sexual orientations, cultures, languages, abilities, beliefs and levels of experience. Added to this, some of us live with mental health issues and/or neurodiversity.  

If we are a leader, this makes our job very challenging. Just how do we bring out the best of every person in our team? How do we grow them whilst simultaneously managing the conflict that often arises? How do we look after each person’s interests whilst still ensuring all the jobs are done? Our settings are as good as our staff, so understanding how to work well with others is vital to enjoying a safe, happy, successful setting while building your team dynamics. 

Mental Health Effecting Team Dynamics

The stats are quite alarming. It appears that 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem of some kind each year in England.  

These problems include depression, anxiety, eating disorders, phobias, bipolar, PTSD and obsessive compulsive disorder. 

Jonathan Haidt’s book,’ The Anxious Generation’, illustrates the stark reality of mental health problems in the Western world. He ascribes the start of this to the introduction of smartphones and the effect this has had on our society. 

Haidt calls it The Phone Generation Effect which impacts, amongst other things, socialising skills. He suggests that attention, listening, engaging, reading emotions, developing relationships and working within a team are all affected by this. 

He notes that put together, this leads to increased anxiety and far less resilience. How many of your team members confess to being very anxious, or state, "I have anxiety"? This state of anxiety is growing exponentially and it is driving our society. 

Of course, anyone of any age can struggle with mental health, including anxiety. Knowing some stressors will help us form strategies for addressing these with our team members. 

Stressors include personal situations, such as grief, family strife or moving house. Another stressor is finance. Many are struggling with debt and running costs and the burden can be overwhelming. Social stressors include relationship difficulties and even the job a person has at the setting can create much internal stress for them. 

I have spoken with many leaders recently who do not know how to manage a team member who is full of anxiety, battling depression or one who is self-harming, or self-medicating. Absences due to mental health problems can be extremely difficult for a leader to manage and for a team to negotiate. 

The first thing to remember is that we are not counselors or therapists. We are not trained to deal with mental health issues. However, we can develop strategies to help us manage mental health challenges in our teams.

Strategies

  • Have clear policies and codes of conduct; adhere to these 
  • Signpost; have information available online and on paper (available in a confidential space) 
  • Keep short accounts; follow up regularly 
  • Use supervisions and appraisals productively 

A very important factor to note is that of capability. It is imperative that a setting has a policy that includes capability pathways. Our fundamental premise at our settings is that children are safe. Does this person’s mental health issue put children (or other adults) in danger? If so, we are responsible for dealing with this fairly and effectively. Another aspect to consider is this: does the rest of the team have to carry the workload of the person who is struggling with mental health? This may be possible for a short time frame, but if it becomes too burdensome, then it is unfair on them and resentments will quickly escalate. 

Neurodiversity 

Some mental health conditions can fall in the neurodivergent category, the most common being ADHD, autism and dyslexia. The Early Years sector naturally attracts neurodiverse individuals, who can bring much richness to our settings. Learning about neurodiversity is part of our duty of care towards our team members.  

Definition 

Neurodivergence is a concept originally attributed to the 1990s sociologist, Judy Singer, who believes that we all represent human diversity and implies that neurodiversity is not a ‘them and us’ situation.  

Laura Boxley, PhD, states that, ‘neurodiversity is the idea that people experience or interact with the world around them in many different ways—some that may not be considered typical. It is based on the framework that ‘different’ is not the same as ‘deficient.’’ 

Neurodivergent individuals often experience differences in: 

  • mental function 
  • learning styles 
  • sensory processing 
  • communication style 
  • behaviours 

Again, as with mental health issues, we need strategies that will benefit us, the team dynamics, and ultimately, the children in our setting.  

Strategies 

  • clear and unambiguous communication, e.g “you will find it next door” – does this mean the room next door, the building next door or another next door? 
  • agendas prior to meetings, reminders 
  • clear rules, policies, and procedures  
  • prior notice of change  

In both mental health and neurodiversity contexts, a key strategy is to educate and inform your team and together, create a supportive culture and improve your team dynamics. 

Using these strategies will lessen misunderstandings, alleviate frustration and promote acceptance for all parties. 

However, the best way a leader can manage these situations and improve team dynamics is through the use of coaching.  

Coaching is about setting and achieving goals…a coach uses insightful questioning to help someone identify the goals they want to achieve, recognise their current circumstances, consider all the options open to them and choose which actions they will take within a defined timeframe’. (The Coaching Academy) 

A coaching approach enables leaders to set the tone of the setting to one of acceptance and encouragement. It empowers people to find their own solutions and to be accountable for their actions. It is goal oriented with clear action points set. People feel heard and understood. There is individual progress but also a deep sense of team cohesion. 

Working well with others can be tricky. It can also be rewarding, beneficial and just plain fabulous! Knowing yourself is the start. Learning about and understanding personality, mental health and neurodiversity is the next step - a step that is both a necessity and a privilege.  

We will all be richer for it. 

EnRich offers training on:
Coaching for Leaders: for leaders of all levels; understand the concept of coaching, learn fundamental skills', and develop a coaching approach in your setting. A 2-hour online tutor-led course and a full day training course are available. Working well with others; understand personality, neurodiversity and mental health and the role these play in a team; learn strategies that benefit all team members and learn coaching skills to empower each one.


“Leadership & management, a coaching approach”; a 6 module course delivered through individual coaching (a day course is also available) that equips every leader in early years to be the best they can be. 

About the author:

Pam McFarlane, a remarkable individual that wears the hats of an Educator, Coach, and Global Explorer. With a deep-rooted passion for nurturing well-being and mental health in the realm of early years, Pam's journey is one of profound impact and meaningful exploration.

About the author:

Pam McFarlane, a remarkable individual that wears the hats of an Educator, Coach, and Global Explorer. With a deep-rooted passion for nurturing well-being and mental health in the realm of early years, Pam's journey is one of profound impact and meaningful exploration.

About the author:

Pam McFarlane, a remarkable individual that wears the hats of an Educator, Coach, and Global Explorer. With a deep-rooted passion for nurturing well-being and mental health in the realm of early years, Pam's journey is one of profound impact and meaningful exploration.

How Music Enhances Problem-Solving Skills In Children

How Music Enhances Problem-Solving Skills In Children

Problem-solving is a life-skill that is essential to success. Being able to look at a situation and identify a pattern, obstacles, and most importantly a solution, is something that we all face, every day. Music can make this learning process so much more enjoyable while supporting problem-solving skills! 

The Power Of Musical Problem-Solving

We know that development happens all the time and has no schedule – every interaction is an opportunity for personal development. To find examples of problem-solving, we’ve looked at the Ages & Stages Questionnaire to find out what you can expect to see in children from as young as 2 months old. 

Babies from 2 months will often look at nearby objects, follow people with their eyes and try to move towards nearby toys, showing their interest in their ability to interact with the people and things around them. As they get older and begin to grasp things, they start to put things in their mouths, exploring the taste and texture of the things around them, even banging them on nearby surfaces. 

By 9 months, babies continue to explore their environment by trying to get things out of clear containers, and finding things “hidden” under paper or fabric. They may pass a toy from hand to hand, or bang toys together if they have a toy in each hand, showing their growing ability to control their environment. 

By 12 months, babies will try to copy adults putting toys into a box or dropping them into a container. They may even copy scribbling on paper with a crayon, or use another object to get a toy just out of reach, learning better ways to do things. 

Building Confidence And Resilience For Problem-Solving Skills

Problem-solving gives children the confidence to be independent in every situation they encounter. And musically, singing is an opportunity for children to problem-solve language, timing and melody. As a life-skill, singing can improve and protect from so many health conditions, and here are a few songs to introduce! 

Mary, Mary 

Mary, Mary, quite contrary
How does your garden grow
With silver bells and cockle shells
And pretty maids all in a row 

This little nursery rhyme has a number of potential histories, ranging from a dark political commentary of Mary Queen of Scots, through to a religious interpretation of Mary, mother of Jesus. And just as beauty is in the eye of the beholder, we can choose to sing this simple song literally according to the words in it. With the summer months being a little warmer, it is a lovely song to teach children, either while gardening or – indoors if raining – imitating gardening actions, just as the words suggest. Children could be given the challenge to create a garden as described in the song, to work together to create a 'Mary garden'. And as an added bonus, there is some evidence that plants thrive with music, so you may end up with a more beautiful garden, too! 

Suagan 

To my lullaby surrender,
Warm and tender is my breast;
Mother's arms with love caressing
Lay their blessing on your rest;
Nothing shall tonight alarm you,
None shall harm you, have no fear;
Lie contented, calmly slumber
On your mother’s breast my dear  

Here tonight I tightly hold you
And enfold you while you sleep
Why, I wonder, are you smiling
Smiling in your slumber deep
Are the angels on you smiling
And beguiling you with charm
While you also smile, my blossom
In my bosom, soft and warm? 

Have no fear now, leaves are knocking
Gently knocking at our door
Have no fear now, waves are beating
Gently beating on the shore
Sleep, my darling, none shall harm you
Nor alarm you, ever will
And beguiling those on high 

This classic Welsh lullaby has become better known through beautiful performances by Aled Jones and Charlotte Church. English translations can be found everywhere, but this is a particularly lovely poetic translation. Both the lovely tune of this song and the timing of it imitate the motion of rocking. This makes it perfect as a song for comforting children in potentially stressful situations where they may be hurt, sad, missing someone, or even going to sleep. Even holding little ones against your chest and just humming the tune can share peaceful reassurance and bring comfort and calm. 

Stand By Me

Ben E. King 

When the night has come
And the land is dark
And the moon is the only light we’ll see 

 And I won’t be afraid
I won’t be afraid
Just as long as you stand
Stand by me 

 So darling, darling, stand by me
Oh, stand by me, oh stand
Stand by me, stand by me 

 If the sky that we look upon
Should tumble and fall
Or the mountain should crumble in the sea 

 I won’t cry, I won’t cry
No, I won’t shed a tear
Just as long as you stand
Stand by me 

 So darling, darling, stand by me
Oh, stand by me, oh stand
Stand by me, stand by me 

This modern lullaby is quickly becoming a classic song that celebrates friendship and community. Celebrating the far-reaching benefits of social support, the vivid words use imagery that the young and old can relate to, like dark nights, mountains and sea. The chorus evokes feelings of love and support, which will only mean more and more to children as they grow older and begin to understand more of the language used. This song could be played to children to sing along while working on group activities where each child’s contribution adds to a bigger project or picture. Ideas could include each child creating painted hand-prints to make the wings of a giant butterfly, or each child colouring different parts of a picture to create a giant mural. 

Problem-solving is quickly becoming an essential skill that gives us a head-start the sooner it is learnt. It relies on developing effective communication skills that are learnt through experience with kind and caring adults. And using music makes it all so much more fun and easy to enhance problem-solving skills ! 

About the author:

Frances Turnbull, a musician, researcher, and accomplished author, boasts a skill set that encompasses both music education techniques and a Master's degree in Education from the University of Cambridge. Frances' literary contributions shine a spotlight of music, dance, and movement within early years education.

About the author:

Frances Turnbull, a musician, researcher, and accomplished author, boasts a skill set that encompasses both music education techniques and a Master's degree in Education from the University of Cambridge. Frances' literary contributions shine a spotlight of music, dance, and movement within early years education.

About the author:

Frances Turnbull, a musician, researcher, and accomplished author, boasts a skill set that encompasses both music education techniques and a Master's degree in Education from the University of Cambridge. Frances' literary contributions shine a spotlight of music, dance, and movement within early years education.

Understanding The EYFS Framework For Children Moving To Reception

Understanding The EYFS Framework For Children Moving To Reception

Transitioning from nursery to primary school is an important life event for children, parents/carers and professionals, but how can you help your parents/carers navigate this transition and how does the EYFS framework help? Here is some useful information and tips to pass on.  

The EYFS And Transitions 

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) covers children from birth to age 5, including the reception year. After reception, children move to key stage 1 (KS1), so there will be several transitions around this age:  

  • Nursery to reception 
  • Reception to Year 1  

When Do Children Have To Go To School? 

Most children start school in reception class, joining full-time in the September after their fourth birthday. For example, a child who turns 4 in June, will usually start school in September that same year. However, some parents delay their start date, especially if they have summer babies. An August baby for example, will have only just turned 4 by September, so some parents may start their child part-time or even part-way through the academic year (e.g. in January).   

Children can miss the whole of reception year and start school for the first time after their 5th birthday, but in these cases, they will go automatically into year 1. Parents who delay starting school still need to apply for a place at the usual time, (when the child is 3 or just turned 4) but they can ask for a later start. See https://www.gov.uk/schools-admissions/how-to-apply for information on applying for school places. Parents can choose to home educate or apply for a place at an independent school too. All children must be in full-time education the term after they turn 5, when they reach what is known as ‘compulsory school age’.  For more information on this, see the Government website at https://www.gov.uk/schools-admissions/school-starting-age. 

The EYFS And Starting School 

The EYFS framework emphasises that transitions from nursery to school or reception to year 1 should be well-planned and as smooth as possible. Transitions should also be seen as a process and not a finite event that occurs on the first day of school.  

In the document, “Birth to 5 Matters”, early years professionals acknowledge that: 

  • Children can feel vulnerable during transitions  
  • High-quality transitions understand the importance of children feeling “known” and value continuity 
  • Transitions give all parties the opportunity for dialogue (parents/carers, school, nurseries) 
  • The key person in the nursery places an essential role in making the process run well and making connections with the school 

EYFS Assessment  

As part of the EYFS, all children will undergo ongoing assessments at various stages including: 

  • Progress check age 2 
  • Reception Baseline Assessment (RBA) – a short assessment undertaken in the first 6 weeks after children start reception 
  • Early Years Profile Assessment – this will be completed for each child in the final term of the year in which the child reaches age 5 (no later than 30th June). It is usually completed by the reception teacher, or nursery provider if the child has not yet started reception. It gives parents/carers, practitioners and teachers a well-rounded picture of a child’s knowledge, understanding, and abilities, their attainment against expected levels, and their readiness for year 1. These are assessed by the professional judgement of the practitioners against the early learning goals in the EYFS 

More detailed information about all these assessments can be found in the EYFS and schools can provide information about their own practices too.  

Move-Up Days  

Many local authorities organise a move-up day that is co-ordinated across the whole local authority, with all children attending their new school on the same day. This allows children to meet their new teachers, make new friends and generally experience what a day in the new venue will be like. It usually takes place in June or July.  

How Parents Can Help With The Transition To School 

 

Talk About The Process And Feelings 

Families should talk about the transition process and be as open and honest with children as possible. Schools and nurseries should also be involved in this so that children know and understand what will happen. Parents/carers should talk to their key person who will be able to help. Allow children to express their own feelings, whether they are excited or anxious  and talk in age-appropriate ways with language they can understand. Pictures/videos can help remind children of their new school and talking to other parents/carers and children who’ve gone through transitions can help too. 

Remind Children About Successes With Past Changes (EYFS: Understanding The World)

Life is constantly changing, and these transitions are one of many transitions that the children will have done, even in their short life. It can be helpful to remind children how well they did moving from home to nursery, or when they changed nursery rooms or key person along the way. This helps children understand they have already successfully faced several changes and that they can do so again.  

Practice Key Skills And Journeys (EYFS: Physical Development)

Try to practice the journey a few times before the move-up day to eliminate worries. Other skills to practice include: 

  • Encouraging the child to carry a lunchbox or bag 
  • Taking a coat off or putting it on independently 
  • Putting on shoes 
  • Walking or scooting carefully
  • Sitting still and focusing attention 

Try to keep things such as bedtime or mealtimes as consistent as possible during this time to aid continuity.   

Stay Calm  

Teach calming exercises to the children such as taking slow, deep breaths, or the 5-4-3-2-1 technique to distract them if they are feeling anxious (list 5 things you see, 4 you hear, 3 you can feel, 2 you smell, 1 you taste). The BBC has lots of advice for parents/carers about transitions at https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zkqnxbk. 

Look At Things From The Child’s Perspective 

Adults learn to manage their emotions through experience, but young children are still developing these skills. They have a different view of the world that can seem trivial to an adult, but can be all encompassing as a child, so try to see these situations through their eyes.  

Encourage And Praise Effort 

Children will not get everything right the first time, so praise their effort above their achievement. This helps them to learn resilience and the important life lessons that can be learnt through trial and error.  

Be Kind To Yourself 

Remember that the transition will affect parents as well as children, so parents should look after their own emotions and feelings too. Children can pick up on the stresses of adults so remaining calm is helpful.  

Expression of interest

Complete the form below if you are interested in joining our family. 

You have Successfully Subscribed!